FAQ Gout

What is Gout?

A condition that causes inflammation and pain in the joints. These are due to the occurrence of monosodium urate crystal deposits in and around the joints. In contrast to lupus, gout affects more men than women. This is often linked to obesity, high blood pressure, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes.

What causes Gout?

Excess level of uric acid in the body results to formation of monosodium urate crystal deposits in the joints. Factors like too much uric acid production in the body, failure of kidney function, and the intake of foods that are high in purines contribute to gout. Foods high in purine include:

  1. Alcoholic, sugary drinks
  2. Game meats, kidneys, brains, and liver
  3. Dried beans and peas
  4. Seafood like anchovies, herring, scallops, sardines, and mackerel

Who are at risk?

  1. Men
  2. Postmenopausal women
  3. People with kidney disease
  4. People with high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or diabetes
  5. Family members of gout patients

What are the symptoms?

  1. Chills
  2. Fever
  3. Feeling of illness
  4. Lumps under the skin
  5. Sever, sudden joint pain
  6. Skin discoloration to red or purple
  7. Swelling and warmth around joint areas

What is the treatment?

General treatment usually depends on severity, symptoms, age, and general health condition. Treatment includes:

  1. Alcohol avoidance
  2. Anti-inflammatory drugs like Colchicine, Corticosteroids, or NSAIDs
  3. Medicine to block and lower uric acid production
  4. Lesser intake of protein-rich foods
  5. Weight regulation
  6. Surgery

Who to call?

At Rheumatology of Central Indiana, we encourage patients to ask questions about these conditions. We have Dr. Tarek Kteleh, a Rheumatologist in Indiana, to answer your inquiries about Gout and Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment. As one of the leading providers of health care to patients with arthritis and other related immunological disorders in Indiana, we invite you to come and visit us. We offer Rheumatologist Treatment in Muncie, Indiana.

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